People

Principal Investigator

phil-people

Philip N. Howard is a professor of communication, information and international studies at the University of Washington and a professor in the School of Public Policy at the Central European University. He investigates the impact of digital media on political life around the world, and his projects on digital activism, global information access, and political Islam have been supported by the National Science FoundationUS Institutes of Peace, and Intel’s People and Practices Group.

His most recent books include Democracy’s Fourth Wave? Digital Media and the Arab Spring (New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2012), Castells and the Media (London, UK: Polity, 2011) and The Digital Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy (New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2010). He is the author of New Media Campaigns and the Managed Citizen (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2006), about how digital information technologies are used to manipulate public opinion in the United States. His books have won praise from across the social sciences, with awards from the American Political Science Association, the American Sociological Association, and the International Communication Association. He has edited Society Online: The Internet in Context (Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage, 2004, with Steve Jones), the Handbook of Internet Politics (London: Routledge, 2008, with Andrew Chadwick) and State Power 2.0:  Authoritarian Entrenchment and Political Engagement Worldwide (Farnham, UK:  Ashgate, 2013, with Muzammil Hussain).  He has authored numerous journal articles examining the role of new information and communication technologies in politics and social development, including pieces in the American Behavioral Scientist, the Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, and New Media & Society. He has worked on several NSF projects, serving on the advisory board of the Survey2000 and Survey2001 Projects, and co-managing a project about Information and Communication Technologies in Central Asia. He teaches courses on research methodspolitics online, and international development. Howard has been a Fellow at the Pew Internet & American Life Project in Washington D.C., the LSE’s Stanhope Centre for Communications Policy Research, Stanford University’s Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, and is currently a fellow at Princeton University’s Center for Information Technology Policy.  His BA is in political science from Innis College at the University of Toronto, his MSc is in economics from the London School of Economics, and his PhD is in sociology from Northwestern University. Contact: pnhoward AT uw DOT edu

 

Research Team

AdeizaMatthew Adeiza is a PhD student in the Department of Communication at the University of Washington. His research explores the impact of digital media on the relational perceptions, attitudes and behaviors among individuals and various groups in the pursuit of their political interests. He previously led the Nigeria section of the global research on user interaction with digital news by the User Research Lab, Leuphana University, Germany. He is the project manager for the Digital Activism Research Project. His personal blog is here.

 

 

Sam WoolleySamuel Woolley is a PhD student in the Department of Communication at the University of Washington. His research focuses on the ways political actors manipulate social media during elections, conflict and security crises. He is particularly interested in the current use of political bots on sites like Twitter, Weibo and Facebook. Methodologically, Sam makes use of ethnography and comparative research. He is currently working on a research project with Dr. Howard focusing on computational propaganda.

 

 

Frank-peopleFrank Edwards is in the PhD program in sociology at the University of Washington.  His research focuses on criminal and juvenile justice, child welfare, historical sociology, and political sociology.  Frank has spent many years working with the Indymedia network and other online grassroots media organizations.  He worked as a coder on the Global Digital Activism Data Set project, created a statistical program to evaluate intercoder reliability, and helped develop the INITTYPE variable, used to categorize a campaign initiator’s organizational complexity.

 

 

Shin-peopleShin Lee Haeng is a graduate student in communication at the University of Washington.  He research focuses on the factors shaping ICT diffusion in East Asia, and its implications. A native of South Korea, Shin worked as a coder on the Global Digital Activism Data Set project during the summer of 2013.

 

 

 

 

Mary-peopleMary Joyce is in the MA/PhD program in communication at the University of Washington.  She is internationally recognized as an expert in global digital activism and frequently speaks publicly and trains activists around the world.  Mary was New Media Operations Manager for President Obama’s 2008 national campaign and is the editor of the 2010 anthology Digital Activism Decoded.  In 2013 she received a Graduate Research Fellowship from the National Science Foundation to support her work. This is the fourth digital activism project that she has founded or co-founded.

 

 

 

 

Jonathan-peopleJonathan Lam is a graduate student in the department of sociology at the University of Washington.  His own research focuses on digital technologies and behavior, race, gender, and stratification.  He worked as a coder on the Global Digital Activism Data Set project during the summer of 2013, bringing his previous experience in digital campaigning and content analysis to the project.

 

 

 

 

Ruth-peopleRuth Moon is in the MA/PhD program in communication at the University of Washington.  Her own research interests focus on international communication and the role journalism plays in humanitarian work and democratization.  She worked as a coder on the Global Digital Activism Data Set project during the summer of 2013, bringing her previous experience in content analysis and several years’ work as a journalist to the project.

 

 

 

 

Luis-peopleLuis Santana is a PhD candidate in communication at the University of Washington.  His research focuses on developing an understanding of collective action online, particularly the psychological and cultural factors that explain online organization.  Hailing from Chile, Luis enjoys working at the intersections of management, research, and advocacy.   He worked as a coder on the Global Digital Activism Data Set project and also helped to develop the GOALTYPE variable used to categorize campaign goals.

 

 

 

 

Danny-peopleDanny Stofleth is in the PhD program in communication at the University of Washington.  His own research focuses on health communication and “mindful” communication and he has a background in human rights and social movement studies.  Danny was a coder on the Global Digital Activism Data Set project in the summer of 2013.